Quality & Planning Surveys and Tests

ETS Proficiency Profile

The Proficiency Profile is an instrument designed to test three skill areas and three academic contexts for proficiency. All of the subject knowledge required to answer the questions are contained in the question itself or in stimulus material that accompany the question. The college plans to use this information to assess the College-Wide General Education Outcomes and to promote dialogue to improve the quality of learning.

As defined by the Proficiency Profile the criteria measured in each of the skills are:

  • Critical Thinking
  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Mathematics
  • Humanities
  • Social Sciences
  • Natural Sciences

Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI)

The Student Satisfaction Survey is a unique tool by Noel Levitz that assesses what is important to students and how satisfied they are. This distinctive tool will allow Greenville Technical College to benchmark against national comparable data for continuous improvement. By administering this instrument we have a systematic method for identifying what our students want, how to meet those needs, and how to improve the quality of our institution. The Department of Quality and Planning administered this survey for the first time spring 2011. The survey closed in May and results are in the process of being analyzed.

Survey of Entering Student Engagement

Administered within the fourth and fifth weeks of the fall academic term, the Survey of Entering Student Engagement (SENSE) focuses on institutional practices and student behaviors in the earliest weeks of college. Survey data is collected, analyzed, and reported back to the college, further supporting our institution's efforts to understand the critical early student experience and to improve practices in ways that will increase student success in the first college year. The project is part of The Center for Community College Student Engagement (CCCSE) and the Community College Leadership Program at The University of Texas at Austin.

The results of this survey are benchmarked into six national benchmarks of effective practice with entering students in community colleges.

  • Early Connections
  • High Expectations and Aspirations
  • Clear Academic Plan and Pathway
  • Effective Tract to College Readiness
  • Engaged Learning
  • Academic and Social Support Network

This survey is administered every other year in classes at GTC that are randomly selected by SENSE to ensure a representative sample and to preserve the integrity of the survey results.

MAPP

The purpose of administering the Measure of Academic Proficiency and Progress (MAPP) was to measure the reading and critical thinking, writing, and mathematic skills of Greenville Technical College associate degree students at the final stage of their program. The college plans to use this information to assess the College-Wide General Education Outcomes and to promote dialogue to improve the quality of learning.

The Measure of Academic Proficiency and Progress is an instrument designed to test three skill areas for proficiency. All of the subject knowledge required to answer the questions are contained in the question itself or in stimulus materials that accompany the question.

As defined by The Measure of Academic Proficiency and Progress the criteria measured in each of the skills are:

Critical Thinking

  • Distinguish between rhetoric and argumentation in a piece of nonfiction prose
  • Recognize assumptions
  • Recognize the best hypothesis to account for information presented
  • Infer and interpret a relationship between variables
  • Draw valid conclusions based on information presented

Reading

  • Interpret the meaning of key terms
  • Recognize the primary purpose of a passage
  • Recognize explicitly presented information
  • Make appropriate inferences
  • Recognize rhetorical devices

Writing

  • Recognize the most grammatically correct revision of a clause, sentence, or group of sentences
  • Organize units of language for coherence and rhetorical effect
  • Recognize and reword figurative language
  • Organize elements of writing into larger units of meaning

Mathematics

  • Recognize and interpret mathematical terms
  • Read and interpret tables and graphs
  • Evaluate formulas
  • Order and compare large and small numbers
  • Interpret ratios, proportions, and percentages
  • Read scientific measuring instruments
  • Recognize and use equivalent mathematical formulas or expressions

Skills Tested at Each Level

To be considered proficient at each level a student should be able to:

Reading and Critical Thinking

Level 1

  • Recognize factual material explicitly presented in a reading passage
  • Understand the meaning of particular words or phrase in the context of a reading passage.

Level 2

  • Synthesize material from different sections of a passage
  • Recognize valid inferences derived from material in the passage
  • Identify accurate summaries of a passage or of significant sections of the passage
  • Understand and interpret figurative language
  • Discern the main idea, purpose, or focus of a passage or a significant portion of the passage

Level 3

  • Evaluate competing casual explanations
  • Evaluate hypotheses for consistency with known facts
  • Determine the relevance of information for evaluating an argument or conclusion
  • Determine whether an artistic interpretation is supported by evidence contained in a work
  • Recognize the salient features or themes in a work of art
  • Evaluate the appropriateness of procedures for investigating a question of causation
  • Evaluate data for consistency with known facts, hypotheses or methods

Writing

Level 1

  • Recognize agreement among basic grammatical elements (e.g., nouns, verbs, pronouns and conjunctions)
  • Recognize appropriate transition words
  • Recognize incorrect word choice
  • Order sentences in a paragraph
  • Order elements in an outline

Level 2

  • Incorporate new material into a passage
  • Recognize agreement among basic grammatical elements (e.g., nouns, verbs, pronouns, and conjunctions) when these elements are complicated by intervening words or phrases
  • Combines simple clauses into single, more complex combinations
  • Recast existing sentences into new syntactic combinations

Level 3

  • Discriminate between appropriate and inappropriate use of parallelism
  • Discriminate between appropriate and inappropriate use of idiomatic language
  • Recognize redundancy
  • Discriminate between correct and incorrect constructions
  • Recognize the most effective revision of a sentence

Mathematics

Level 1

  • Solve word problems that would most likely be solved by arithmetic and do not involve conversion of units or proportionality (These problems can be multi-step if the steps are repeated rather than embedded.)
  • Solve problems involving the informational properties of numbers and operations, often involving the Number Line, including positive and negative numbers, whole numbers and fractions (including conversions of common fractions to percent, such as converting ¼ to 25 %.)
  • Solve problems requiring a general understanding of square roots and the squares of numbers
  • Solve a simple equation or substitute numbers into an algebraic expression
  • Find information from a graph (This task may involve finding a specified piece of information in a graph that also contains other information.)

Level 2

  • Solve arithmetic problems with some complications, such as complex wording, maximizing or minimizing, and embedded rations (These problems include algebra problems that can be solved by arithmetic [the answer choices are numeric].)